You can help shape the future of energy in Canada.
Let's get started.

You can add your voice to the energy conversation that takes place on social media. The following tips can help you extend your community online to grow support for Canada’s energy industry.

  • Be positive. Maintain a positive tone throughout your posts.
  • Avoid arguments. Don’t shy away from engaging in meaningful conversations, and make sure to challenge false information when you see it. However, be sure to avoid having an argument on social media. Do debate with another person, but remember to stay calm and use facts and always be respectful.
  • Follow politicians. Follow legislators on Twitter to demonstrate that you’re interested in what they have to say, and tag their handle in tweets, where appropriate.
  • Share. Retweet and share information posted by legislators and by other Energy Citizens.
  • Include visuals. Take and post photos at events. Visuals can include your own photos as well as images shared from the @Energy_Citizens Twitter and Facebook profiles. Content with visuals is much more likely to get attention: tweets with photos receive 41 percent more retweets and 48 percent more likes than tweets without photos. Meanwhile, Facebook posts with photos generate 53 per cent more Likes, and 104 percent more comments. However, always be sure to respect any rules the event organizers may have around taking photos and be mindful of others.
  • Tweet at events. Tweet images, quotes, and other things you find interesting from events. If you attend an event in the morning, consider saving some content for the afternoon, as your followers may be online at different times. You can also tweet about upcoming events so that more people can know about them in advance, and maybe even join you.
  • Include links. Provide links to more information whenever possible, such as information from the Energy Citizens website, so that your audience can learn more about the topic at hand.
  • Tag @Energy_Citizens. Tag @Energy_Citizens (Energy Citizens’ Twitter handle) when possible so that Energy Citizens can retweet your posts. Your content will reach an even larger audience.
  • Proofread. Make sure to proofread all social content carefully before publishing. Typos are easy to make when posting quickly, especially if posting from a phone.

Accounts To Follow

Below are some examples of people and organizations to follow in order to stay up to date on the latest news and conversations surrounding the energy industry in Canada.

Canada’s Energy Citizens: @Energy_Citizens
Title: A movement of Canadians supporting the positive role Canada's Oil and Natural Gas industry plays in our lives
Why follow: Get involved and get the latest updated from Canada’s largest movement in support of our Oil and Natural Gas industry

Canada Action: @CanadaAction
Title: Non-profit organization advocating for continued Canadian opportunity from coast to coast
Why follow: Hear from other groups that advocate for a strong energy industry and add your voice to the conversation

Oil Sands Action: @oilsandsaction
Title: Affiliate of Canada Action focused on Canada’s oil sands
Why follow: Hear from other groups that advocate for Canada’s oil sands and add your voice to the conversation

Oil Respect: @oilrespect
Title: Online campaign to defend the Canadian oil and gas industry
Why follow: Hear from other groups that advocate for a strong energy industry and add your voice to the conversation

Pipeline Action: @pipelineaction
Title: Online campaign to defend the Canadian oil and gas industry
Why follow: Hear from other groups that advocate for a strong energy industry and add your voice to the conversation

Catherine McKenna: @cathmckenna
Title: Ottawa Centre MP and Minister of Environment & Climate Change
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting all of Canada

Jim Carr: @jimcarr_wpg
Title: Federal Minister of National Resources
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting all of Canada

Candice Bergen: @CandiceBergenMP
Title: MP for Portage-Lisgar in Manitoba and advocate for Canada's Natural Resources as the Official Opposition Critic
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting Alberta, the home base of Canada’s oil and natural gas industry

Shannon Phillips: @sphillipsab
Title: Alberta Minister of Environment and Parks and the Minister Responsible for the Climate Change Office
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting Manitoba

Rachel Notley: @rachelnotley
Title: Premier of Alberta and Leader of Alberta's NDP
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting Alberta, the home base of Canada’s oil and natural gas industry

Marg McCuaig-Boyd: @MargMcCuaigBoyd
Title: Energy Minister for Government of Alberta and MLA for Dunvegan-Central Peace-Notley
Why follow: Hear about decisions and activities impacting Alberta, the home base of Canada’s oil and natural gas industry

Brad Wall: @PremierBradWall
Title: Premier of Saskatchewan and MLA for Swift Current
Why follow: Premier Wall is a very strong advocate for Canadian oil and gas on the provincial and national stages

Deborah Yedlin: @ddyedlin
Title: Calgary Herald business columnist who focuses on oil and gas issues
Why follow: Access to breaking news from Canada and abroad

Peter Tertzakian: @PTertzakian
Title: Chief Energy Economist, ARC Financial
Why follow: Learn more about the financial forces and current events impacting energy in Canada

Jeff Gaulin: @CAPP_Jeff
Title: VP Communications, CAPP
Why follow: Have access to the latest opinions and ideas from the industry

Bloomberg Energy News: @BloombergNRG
Why follow: Access to breaking energy news from Canada and abroad

Back To Top

Hashtags To Know

On social media sites such as Twitter, a hashtag is a pound sign, or “#”, placed before a word or phrase. Its purpose is to tag and collect all posts about a specific topic, so it’s easier to follow the conversation in today’s busy online world. Below are some hashtags you might consider using in your tweets, in order to ensure that your voice becomes part of the broader energy conversation:

#cdnpoli
What its for: Widely used to discuss Canadian politics

#bcpoli, #ableg, #skpoli, #mbpoli, #onpoli, #qcpoli, #nbpoli, #nspoli, #peipoli, #nfpoli, #nwtpoli, #ykpoli, #nupoli
What's it for: Province and territory-specific political hashtags

#EnergyEast, #TransMountain, #NorthernGateway
What's it for: Hashtag used when talking about specific pipeline projects

#oilsands
What's it for: Hashtag used when talking about the oil sands

#pipelines
What's it for: Hashtag used when talking about pipelines

#LNGinBC
What's it for: Hashtag used when talking about liquid natural gas in British Columbia

#YYC (Calgary), #YMM (Fort McMurray), #YEG (Edmonton), #YYZ (Toronto), #YVR (Vancouver)
What's it for: When talking about a specific province or city, use the airport code hashtag for that city since these are shorter than the actual city names and can save space in your tweet for other content

#NameofEvent
What's it for: When talking about an event, you can research and use the official event hashtag

Back To Top

Using Social Media To Reach Journalists

Just as we are increasingly turning to social media for news, so are journalists. They use it to research stories, follow trends, and interact with their own networks. Social media, and Twitter especially, can be an effective way to reach them.

When you tag a journalist’s handle on Twitter, they receive a notification that they have been tagged, which makes it much more likely that they’ll read your tweet. If you would like to reach out to a journalist on social media, make sure that you have a clear message to get across. Journalists receive a lot of messages every day, so the clearer you can be and the more useful information you can provide, the better.

How to engage with journalists
Below are some examples of what engaging with a journalist through social media can look like:

  1. Respond to their tweet or articles
    Eg: “@journalist Really interesting take on the importance of keeping our energy industry competitive #cdnpoli”
  2. Retweet their tweets or articles.
    This can be a simple click, or you can add your own brief commentary.
  3. Share their article with your network
    Eg: “Check out latest article by @journalist & learn more about why #pipelines are so important for Canada bit.ly/shorturl
Back To Top