Alberta Caribou Meetings – Take Part

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The Government of Alberta is seeking input on their proposed regulations for Northern Alberta to help promote the stability and recovery of the provinces caribou population. We all have an interest in maintain species at risk here in Alberta, and it is important for Albertans like you to take part.

You can take part in this consultation two different ways. First you can register and fill out the government’s online form. You are allowed to provide them any feedback you deem necessary.

Finally, you can attend one of their live public information sessions that will be happening in communities across Northwestern Alberta. The government currently has dates listed for Whitecourt, Edmonton, Fort McMurray, High Level and Grande Prairie.  You can view those dates and venues here.



Things to Remember: 
 

  • We all want the same thing: to help promote stability and recovery of Alberta’s caribou population while maintaining jobs and Alberta’s prosperity. 
    • We need a solution that does both, and does not risk our caribou population or local jobs.
    • Canada’s oil and natural gas industry has committed to habitat restoration but could be constrained to deliver on their commitment without a productive landscape to develop Alberta’s oil and natural gas resources. 
    • Some people believe that ‘zonation’ as it’s currently presented doesn’t promote a healthy oil and natural gas industry into the future and is looking to collaborate with government to identify a reasonable package that works for both parties. 
    • Many who work in the oil and natural gas industry believe they can develop a credible plan that promotes a working landscape and allows companies to make business decisions based on global market demand to enable a viable industry and protect the caribou.

  • Industry supports long-term stability and recovery of the national caribou population. 
    • Caribou recovery will be a long-term, multi-decade process. Actions to achieve or maintain critical caribou habitat may need to be combined with efforts to increase or stabilize population to enable recovery.

  • Significant oil and natural gas operations and development opportunity exists in some of the proposed protected areas.
    • There remains a strong need for stakeholder consultation, consideration of future development plans beyond existing commitments, and resource valuation analysis.
       
  • No single factor is responsible for the decline in caribou populations in northern Alberta. 
    • On a shared land base, habitat disturbance from agriculture, forestry and oil and natural gas development all contribute. There are opponents out there who want to blame the oil and natural gas industry for everything. That is not what we should appeal to here. We need a moderate approach that defends local jobs and creates stability for Alberta’s caribou population.

  • Many factors impacting caribou are outside of the oil and natural gas industry’s control. 
    • Caribou numbers across Canada are declining by fire, disease, predators and other, non-energy industrial development.
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